ICQI

18th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry

May 18-22, 2022

Theme: Transformative Visions and Utopias of Hope in Qualitative Inquiry

The Organizing Committee of ICQI 2022 has been carefully evaluating how the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may impact the 2022 Congress meetings, including various forms of engagement (sessions, workshops, publisher exhibits, etc.) and delivery (face-to-face, hybrid, virtual). At present, we are hopeful that conditions will permit the 2022 Congress to be an in-person event at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and are making plans toward that end.

If the Congress is held in-person for 2022, Congress attendees must abide by any current COVID campus guidelines given by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

However, the safety of our community is of the utmost importance. Given the current state of the global pandemic, it may become necessary in the intervening period for the Congress to move solely to a fully online virtual model for 2022 (as we were forced to do in 2021). We trust that participants will bear with us as we navigate these difficult and uncertain times.

We will continue to update the ICQI community via the Congress website (http://icqi.org) as we proceed in our planning over the next few months.

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The theme of the 2022 Congress is Transformative Visions and Utopias of Hope in Qualitative Inquiry.

Abstracts can be submitted beginning September 1, 2021 through January 15.

As we prepare for the 2022 Congress, it is becoming ever more common to hear that ‘the world’ has turned multiple corners in the last year: COVID-19 vaccines are becoming increasingly available to the broader population; global economies are rebounding; a new- found sense of hope is slowly making its way into the popular vernacular.

And yet while the above may ring true in some quarters of the world, we cannot lose sight of the broader context in which the 2022 Congress will take place: not only will the social, cultural, political, and economic fallout from COVID-19 continue to impact all quarters of daily life (including the politicization of vaccines, mask wearing, and so forth), but so, too, will the following: the social justice struggles of BlackLivesMatter and #MeToo movements; growing violence against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities; rising authoritarianism and nationalist sentiment; settler colonialism; environmental crises; economic shocks to higher education; continuing public health crises; political assaults on science; the fracturing of communities.

In these uncertain times, the 2022 Congress looks ahead with a renewed sense of hope, but remains grounded in the reality that much work lies ahead. Collectively and collaboratively, this moment calls for a critical, performative, social justice inquiry directed at the multiple crises of our historical present. We need a rethinking of where we have been, and, crucially, where we are going–and how we will get there. Our inquiry must meet the demands of our hopeful–but evolving–future. It is in the hands of the diverse and evolving ICQI community to intervene into the challenges and demands that we face–to be present to the history that we all shape. These challenges and demands may require us to rethink our ethical, political, and methodological moorings–especially in an evolving COVID landscape. Although we do not know what the future may hold, we must ensure our voices will be heard as we continue to intervene into the spaces of the everyday–working toward a more diverse, inclusive, and transformative present.

Sessions in the 2022 Congress will take up these topics, as well as those related to and/or utilizing: feminist inquiry; Critical Race Theory; intersectionality; queer theory; critical disability research; phenomenology; Indigenous methodologies; postcolonial and decolonized knowing; poststructural engagements; diffraction and intra-action; digital methodologies; autoethnography; visual methodologies; thematic analysis; performance; art as research; critical participatory action research; multivocality; collaborative inquiry; and the politics of evidence. Sessions will also discuss threats to shared governance; attacks on freedom of speech; public policy discourse; and research as resistance.

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Additionally, and as part of our ongoing commitment to further the conversation on qualitative inquiry amidst our COVID-19 landscape, we are inaugurating a recurring special ‘themed’ section of the SAGE journal Cultural Studies<=>Critical Methodologies on transformative visions for critical qualitative inquiry in COVID times. This is a historical present that cries out for emancipatory visions, for visions that inspire transformative inquiries, for inquiries that can provide the moral compass to move people to struggle and resist oppression. But despair prevails. Are our only weapons masks, vaccines, and hiding in our homes? How do we find meaning in a world now defined by a seemingly out of control act of nature? What does a transformative paradigm mean under such circumstances? And, simultaneously, how do we confront the human made pandemics of inequality, poverty, suffering, racism, climate change, violence oppression, and injustice we continue to face in the contemporary moment? There can be no turning away.

Cultural Studies<=>Critical Methodologies (CSCM) publishes peer-reviewed research articles, critical analyses, autoethnography, poetry, and creative non-fiction. CSCM provides an explicit forum for the intersections of cultural studies, critical interpretive research methodologies, and cultural critique. We welcome a wide variety of submissions informed by feminist inquiry; Critical Race Theory; intersectionality; queer theory; critical disability research; phenomenology; Indigenous methodologies; postcolonial and decolonized knowing; poststructural engagements; diffraction and intra-action; digital methodologies; autoethnography; visual methodologies; thematic analysis; performance; art as research; critical participatory action research; multivocality; collaborative inquiry; and the politics of evidence. Manuscripts for this recurring special section may be submitted for consideration to the journal at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cscm

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ICQI has been held annually on the campus of the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). Founded in 2005, its mission is to facilitate the development of qualitative research methods across a wide variety of academic disciplines. ICQI provides leadership to demonstrate the promise of qualitative inquiry as a form of democratic practice, to show how qualitative inquiry can be used to directly engage pressing social issues at the level of local, state, national and global communities. The Congress sponsors the journal International Review of Qualitative Research (IRQR), and three book series. It is the largest annual gathering of qualitative scholars in the world.

Scholars come to the Congress to resist, to celebrate community, to experiment with traditional and new methodologies, with new technologies of representation. Together we seek to develop guidelines and exemplars concerning advocacy, inquiry and social justice concerns. We share a commitment to change the world, to engage in ethical work that makes a positive difference. As critical scholars, our task is to bring the past and the future into the present, allowing us to engage realistic utopian pedagogies of hope.

Scholars from around the world have accepted the challenge to gather together in common purpose to collectively imagine creative and critical responses to a global community in crisis. The International Congress offers us an opportunity to experiment, take risks, explore new presentational forms, share experiences, problems and hopes concerning the conduct of critical qualitative inquiry in this time of global uncertainty.